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Showing posts tagged with: big data

The Power of Thick Data

by BIGfish

business marketing

In recent years, there has been a lot of hype around “big” data in the marketing world. Big data is extremely helpful with gathering quantitative information about new trends, behaviors and preferences, so it’s no wonder companies invest a lot of time and money sifting through and analyzing massive sets of data. However, what big data fails to do is explain why we do what we do. “Thick” data fills the gap. Thick data is qualitative information that provides insights into the everyday emotional lives of consumers. It goes beyond big data to explain why consumers have certain preferences, the reasons they behave the way they do, why certain trends stick and so on. Companies gather this data by conducting primary and secondary research in the form of surveys, focus groups, interviews, questionnaires, videos and other various methods. Ultimately, to understand people’s actions and what drives them to your business (or not), you need to understand the humanistic context in which they pursue these actions. It’s crucial for successful companies to analyze the emotional way in which people use their products or services to develop a better understanding of their customers. By using thick data, companies can develop a positive relationship with their customers and it becomes easier for those companies to maintain happy customers and attract new ones. Big data will tell you that in 2013, Samsung was able to sell 35 million more smartphones than Apple. But what can these companies really do with this data? Pat themselves on the back or hang their heads in shame? If you are in the market for a smartphone, you’re not going to buy a Samsung because they sold 35 million more than Apple.  As a customer, you probably don’t even know this information. You may, however, buy a Samsung because they offer a multitude of models that you can customize to your preferences, and Apple’s product line is less diverse. Or perhaps you won’t buy an Apple smartphone because it’s not quite as durable, or they don’t have as wide a selection of phone colors as Samsung. Using thick data to figure out why more people are buying from Samsung is key for both companies to move forward and either keep dominating the market, or reinvent to gain dominance. At its core, business is about making bets on human behavior, and those bets backed by thick data are what business models should be based around. Take for example Lego, a successful company that was near collapse in the early 2000’s because they lost touch with their customers. After failed attempts to reposition the company with action figures and other concepts, Jørgen Vig Knudstorp, CEO of the Danish Lego firm, decided to engage in a major qualitative research project. Children in five major global cities were studied to help Lego better understand the emotional needs of children in relation to legos. After evaluating hours of video recordings of children playing with legos, a pattern emerged. Children were passionate about the “play experience” and the process of playing. Rather than the instant gratification of toys like action figures, children valued the experience of imagining and creating. The results were clear; Lego needed to go back to marketing its traditional building blocks and focus less on action figures and toys. Today, Lego is once again a successful company, and thick data proved to be its savior. While it’s impossible to read the minds of customers, thick data allows us to be closer than ever to predicting the quirks of human behavior. The problem with big data is that companies can get too caught up in numbers and charts and forget the humanistic reality of their customers’ lives. As this Wall Street Journal article puts it, “By outsourcing our thinking to Big Data, our ability to make sense of the world by careful observation begins to wither, just as you miss the feel and texture of a new city by navigating it only with the help of a GPS”. This is not to say big data is useless. It is a powerful and helpful tool companies should invest in. However, companies should also invest in gathering and analyzing thick data to uncover the deeper, more human meaning of big data. Together, thick data and big data give you an incredibly insightful advantage. -Jess Cook

The Role of Big Data in Marketing

by BIGfish

marketing public relations social media technology

“Data-driven decisions are better than intuition-based ones.”  -- Bruce Berger, PR professor

Researchers and companies are gathering massive amounts of user data from websites like Facebook, Twitter and Wikipedia and discovering new ways of interpreting this information. These methods enable us to uncover trends and connections we otherwise wouldn’t have access to. Advertisers and public relations professionals are using this information to learn more about consumers so they can create highly targeted campaigns that are more relevant.

Earlier this summer Taha Yasseri, a student at the University of Oxford, analyzed user activity on Wikipedia and found the most controversial articles on the site. Yasseri based this research on “mutual reverts,” meaning one user makes changes, another reverts those changes, the original user changes it back again, and so on.

The top 10 most controversial topics on Wikipedia (in English) are listed below:

  1. George W Bush

  2. Anarchism

  3. Muhammad

  4. List of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. employees

  5. Global Warming

  6. Circumcision

  7. United States

  8. Jesus

  9. Race and intelligence

  10. Christianity

While most topics on this list may be expected, others come as a surprise. Without this kind of analysis, we may not have known certain topics are so highly disputed (so, who is employed by the WWE?). Yasseri’s research is a good example of how the internet has made it easier than ever to understand consumer insight. Marketers are always looking for content that consumers will find compelling or shareable. They could use this kind of information to tap into hot topics, or to steer clear of polarizing ones.

Yasseri isn’t the only one exploring the field of data aggregation and gaining insight from online activity. Boston-based company Bluefin Labs analyzes social media posts about TV shows. In doing this, Bluefin can see which television shows or networks generate the most buzz on social media and which audience segments are driving the conversation. Bluefin can then take it one step further and look at users’ past tweets to draw unexpected conclusions about specific audiences. For example, fans of That ’70s Show “happened to comment often about makeup. Ad time during those programs turned out to be surprisingly wise buys for cosmetics companies.”

After joining forces with Twitter in February, Bluefin is now part of a larger plan thanks to Twitter’s multi-year agreement with Nielsen to develop a project called the “Nielsen Twitter TV Rating.” The Nielsen Twitter TV Rating sets out to take the individual television programs discussed on Twitter and measure the volume of each conversation. Just like traditional TV ratings, higher Twitter ratings would make a TV show more appealing to advertisers, therefore increasing ad revenue.

Facebook is also exploring the capabilities of data aggregation with the launch of its new Graph Search. With this tool users can cross reference their searches with casual words and phrases like “my friends who like That 70’s Show.” The launch of Graph Search is great news for businesses with Pages on Facebook, enabling them to learn more about their consumers interests. This knowledge means companies can share content that’s more relevant to their audience and hopefully grow their fan base. Growing that fan base is increasingly important as Facebook plans to change its Graph Search algorithm so that Pages with more Likes will be more likely to appear.

With so many ways to collect and analyze large amounts of data on consumers, a good question to ask is, what does this mean for the future of marketing? Many marketers are taking advantage of these tools to learn more about consumers and then create highly targeted campaigns.

Marketers can now collect massive amounts of data, enabling them to create more personalized campaigns. Companies now know the best time and day of the week to post on social media or promote an ad to generate the most responses. We know which issues are affecting the public the most, how long people spend dwelling on these issues before moving on to other ones, where the variation in opinions on controversial subjects lie, and what stimulates discussion.

All of this is great news for marketers. The more we know about the demographics and psychographics of each market segment, the more targeted and effective campaigns can and will become. Consumers will also benefit from this as they’re more likely to see ads that are relevant to them. With new developments like Twitter TV Ratings, consumers can also voice their opinions loud and clear, and it’s imperative that companies listen to what they have to say.

Alex Hitchcock & Brigid Gorham

When Your Client Wins TechCrunch Disrupt

by BIGfish

awards our team public relations successes technology

A couple of BIGfish team members, myself included, had the privilege of attending TechCrunch Disrupt in New York last week (click here to see our photos). The three-day event, which TechCrunch calls “one of the most anticipated technology conferences of the year,” featured a number of interesting startups (see: Sand Sign) and several distinguished speakers (hi there Marissa Mayer!). But the most exciting part of the conference was the Startup Battlefield, a startup launch competition we were lucky enough to be involved in.

empire

We made the trip to the Big Apple on behalf of Enigma, a new search and discovery platform for public data. Amazingly enough, 90% of the data in the world today was created in the past two years alone. And although petabytes of public data are created each year, it is nearly impossible to navigate and discover connections across them. Enigma solves this problem by collecting, curating and relating public data sources, in effect creating an infrastructure for big data.

Enigma

Enigma’s innovative approach to big data earned them a spot in the Startup Battlefield, giving the company the opportunity to pitch their business model in front of the audience and a panel of judges on Tuesday afternoon. Despite being up against 29 other startups, Enigma was selected as one of six finalists to advance to the finals round on Wednesday thanks to their clear presentation and impressive platform. Talk about making a PR pro’s job easy!

With Enigma in the finalist round, we woke up Wednesday morning energized and ready for a busy day on the floor. Between answering questions, coordinating press briefings, and sneaking upstairs a few times to catch some of the various speakers (we couldn’t miss Ashton Kutcher!), the day flew by. Before we knew it, it was time to head back to Penn Station. But the winner hadn’t been announced yet - and Enigma had emerged as a clear crowd-favorite.

ashton

We were thrilled when TechCrunch announced that Enigma had won the Startup Battlefield and would be taking home the Disrupt Cup alongside a check for $50,000. Sadly, the conference ran later than expected, forcing us to watch Enigma celebrate on stage from a tiny laptop screen on our train back to Boston.

Regardless, it’s always exciting to see a client win - even more so when it’s announced in front of a live audience at a well-respected tech event. So from all of us at BIGfish, congratulations to Enigma! Get ready for big things to come from this emerging company.

floor

--Jacqui Johnstone, Assistant Account Manager

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